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1971 4x4 F-250 drive train info for the truck

Transmission | Transfer Case | Differental | Winch | Future Tech

5.4L DOHC Modular V8

The original engine was a 360 FE engine that was changed for a 390 FE. The intake is a Holly 750 double pumper, sort of overkill. The heads have new valve guides and 3 plane valve job. A compression ratio of 11.5:1 which means I currently need to run premium gas. Headman headers and turbo mufflers complete the exhaust system. The truck currently gets six miles to the gallon. Not a happy world to be in.

I have gotten a 5.4l DOHC engine from a 2003 Lincoln Navigator VIN R. The 5.4 L (330 CID) V8 is a member of the Modular engine family first introduced in the redesigned 1997 Ford F-150 as a Triton V8. Bore diameter is 90.2 mm (3.552 in) and stroke is 105.8 mm (4.165 in), the increased stroke necessitated a taller 256 mm (10.079 in) engine block deck height. A 169.1 mm (6.658 in) connecting rod length is used to achieve a 1.60:1 rod to stroke ratio. The 5.4 L is built in Windsor, Ontario at the Windsor Engine plant.

Ford's "Fail-Safe Cooling System" is unique. This system is designed to protect the engine due to loss of coolant (since these engines can not overheat for being 'overworked'). If the engine overheats, it will automatically switch from 8/10 cylinder (depending on V8 or V10 engine) operation to alternating 4/5 cylinder (depending on V8 or V10 engine) operation. Because there is now 50% less hot combustion, the engine will operate cooler. The vehicle will continue to operate, but with very limited engine power. The now so-called 'dead' cylinders also act like an air pump to cool the engine down even more. This system allows the driver to travel a short distance to obtain service or to reach a repair facility. The distance that can be traveled depends upon vehicle load, outside temperature, and current road conditions.

Ford encodes the engine type in character 8 of the VIN.

Engine codes for light trucks table found at Wikibooks

Config.

Name

Disp.

Description

Fuel

Power (hp)

VIN code

Notes

V8 Triton 4.6 L SOHC/EFI (W) Gasoline 215-240 6
SOHC/EFI (W) Gasoline 225-239 W
DOHC Gasoline 300 H
Triton 5.4 L SOHC/EFI Gasoline 250-260 L
CNG 225-260 M
SOHC Gasoline/CNG 260 Z
Intech 5.4 L DOHC (W) Gasoline 295-300 A
DOHC Gasoline 300 R
SOHC (E) Gasoline 300 5
SOHC Gasoline 380 3
Powerstroke 6.0 L EFI Diesel 225-325 P International Truck and Engine Co.
7.3 L Turbo Diesel 250-275 F Navistar
V10 Triton 6.8 L SOHC/EFI Gasoline 305-310 S

Transmission - ZF S6-650
Note: the 7.3L has a different bellhousing bolt pattern than all the other Modular engines

ZF 6 speed manual

The original transmission is a 4 speed New Process 435. It is not going to be part of the rebuild. The gearing is way to low and only allows the truck to reach a maximum speed of about 70mph.

ZF stands for Zahnradfabrik Friedrichshafen.

An important thing to know if you are thinking of a similar project is this. Most web sites seem to say that the only 6spd available in new ford trucks is available with the diesel 7.3l engine. The 7.3l has a different bell housing bolt pattern than the rest of the engines available for the Ford Super Duty, so don't get one from a 7.3l and expect it to bolt to a 5.4l. My understanding is that the 6spd became available in trucks with a 5.4l starting in '02. I currently have a ZF S6-650 out of an '02 F250 4x2 mounted to a 5.4l. So it will mount to the Modular 5.4l that I have out of a Navigator. One big difference between the transmission available for the 7.3l and the other design is the fact that the transmission for the 7.3l has a PTO drive on both sides where the other transmission only has a PTO drive on the drivers side only. Otherwise it is the same, it still has cooler lines coming out of it on the passengers side of the case. Id tags are mounted on the left side of the main case. If you get the Ford part number off the tag you can look it up on this chart and verify what vehicle it came from.

Gear ratios...
1st = 5.79, 2nd = 3.31, 3rd = 2.10, 4th = 1.31, 5th = 1.00, 6th = 0.76 Reverse = 5.23

and from the ZF Freidrichshafen AG - AZ North America web site...

ZF 6-speed manual transmissions are designed for Ford and GM truck drivers who place a high premium on performance with flexibility, and responsiveness with control. With simple H-pattern shifting allowing for 3-up seating and easy "toggling" between 1st and reverse for increased maneuverability. ZF transmissions are easy and more comfortable to operate. With lightweight aluminum housings, they provide improved fuel efficiency with lower maintenance and repair costs while delivering a increased torque capacity for today's high powered pickup trucks.

ZF transmissions are true workhorses, designed and built for optimal flexibility during repetitive heavy-duty tasks and ideally suited for the harshest environments, while at the same time offering a rather engaging driving experience.

ZF 6-speed manual transmissions are available standard on GM trucks with 6600 Duramax, and 8100 Vortec engines, and Ford trucks with 5.4L V8, 6.8L V10 and PowerStroke 6.0L engines.

 

Sources:

I am finding a discrepancy in these dates. However on a few web sites I find that the ZF5 was used in 1988 or later Ford 4 wheel drive pick up with small block engine. The ZF S542 was used from 1988-1994 and the ZF S547 from 1995 on. However if you look at the ZF Wiki it clearly shows different information for the ZF S547. The ZF S6-650 seems to match this information, the only thing is I'm pretty sure that Ford still uses the ZF S6-650 in '09.

Model

Year

Trans Model

Bronco 88-92 5spd ZF
Ford F150 2wd 88-96 5spd ZF
Ford F150 4wd 88-96 5spd ZF
Ford F250/350 2wd 88-96 5spd ZF
Ford F250/350 4wd 88-96 5spd ZF
Ford F250/350 4wd 97-99 5spd mazda/toyo kogyo
F250F350 SDUTY 2wd 99-01 5spd ZF
F250F350 SDUTY 4wd 99-01 5spd ZF
F250F350 SDUTY 2wd 02-09 6spd ZF
F250F350 SDUTY 4wd 02-09 6spd ZF

 

Identification:

One of the easiest ways to spot a ZF5 is ribbed crisscross pattern on the sides. Both transmissions are aluminum and have an integral bell housing (one piece with the transmission) with a top mounted shift tower. Look for a PTO cover plates on the driver's side. The case also has ZF cast into the side. Weight for each unit is approximately 175 lbs. for the 5sp and the 6sp is about 230 lbs.

Adapter required?

The ZF integral bell housing will bolt directly to your stock 8 cyl engine. The bolt pattern for the 7.3l Powerstroke is not the same as any of the other Modular engines. They also require a new spud shaft for my transfer case. Due to the fact that my truck has a divorced transfer case it seems I would be able to use either 4x4 or 2x4 transmission. However I have gotten a 2x4 transmission.

Modifications needed:

The swap requires a custom fabricated cross member. It also requires a hydraulic clutch due to the integral bell housing. The addition of a hydraulic master cylinder will also need to done. The only issues I can seem to find from forums are replacing the original 4 speed floor pan with one from an automatic,then cut a hole for the shifter. The ZF shift lever is positioned further forward than the OEM unit. In addition the seam on the firewall will rub and needs to be flattened out. The list below is for reference as to the gear ratios. I don't want an Automatic but list some of them for reference.

Manual Transmissions

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

Bronco 3 spd (6 cyl) 3.41 1.86 1.00      
Bronco 3 spd (8 cyl) 2.99 1.75 1.00      
NP 435 6.69 3.34 1.79 1.00    
T-18 6.32 3.09 1.69 1.00    
Toploader (Close ratio) 2.32 1.69 1.29 1.00    
Toploader (Wide ratio) 2.78 1.93 1.35 1.00    
Toploader (Overdrive) 3.29 1.84 1.00 0.81    
ZF5 5.72 2.94 1.61 1.00 0.76  
ZF6 5.79 3.31 2.10 1.31 1.00 0.72
NV4500 (Dodge) 5.61 3.04 1.67 1.00 0.73  
             

Automatic Transmissions

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

Bronco C4 2.46 1.46 1.00      
C6 2.46 1.46 1.00      
AOD 2.40 1.47 1.00 .67    
AOD w/ low gear set 2.84 1.55 1.00 .67    
AODE/4R70W* 2.84 1.55 1.00 .67    
700R4 3.06 1.62 1.00 .70    

TRANSFER CASE - DANA 24

Dana 24

The Dana 24 was installed in F-250 4x4's from 1960 through 1972. This model is a stand-alone unit sometimes referred to as a divorce-mounted transfer case. Divorced just refers to the fact that the transfer case is not attached to the transmission and has a short drive shaft between the two. It has two-speeds: High and Low. The gear ratios are 1.86 and 1.00 to 1. There are four shifting positions: 4L-N-2H-4H (and an undocumented and not-recommended 5th position between 4L and N which will give you 2wd low). Defective transfer case bearings are a common source of drive-train vibrations. It is well worth the time and effort to have the transfer case rebuilt.

Dana 24's are PTO-capable. The Dana 23/24 PTO's are very rare and highly prized by early Napco conversion truck owners. There were 2 styles: The early style Dana PTO that was a big cast unit that bolted directly to the case and the later style that used the standard 6 bolt PTO pattern with a thick adapter plate to fit the 23/24 cases. The early style are worth their weight in gold.

If you are using 80 or 90W gear lube in your transmission or transfer case then it will not operate as smoothly as it should. Ford service and operating manuals both recommend using 50W engine oil in both the 4-speed manual trans and the transfer case when the operating temperatures are over 10 degrees Fahrenheit (30W engine oil is recommended when the operating temperatures are below 10 degrees Fahrenheit).

A big shortcoming of the Dana 24 case is it's lack of a strut rod or really any way to easily adapt one to it. Under heavy loading (such as towing conditions), a divorced transfer case tends to jerk forward-and-aft and makes for a rough ride and the truck's drivetrain takes a good beating from it.

I am going to keep the original transfer case, os the following is really just for information. The Dana 24 was installed in F-250 4x4's from 1960 through 1972. This model is a stand-alone unit sometimes referred to as a divorce-mounted transfer case. It has two-speeds: High and Low. The gear ratios are 1.86 and 1.00 to 1. There are four shifting positions: 4L-N-2H-4H (and an undocumented and not-recommended 5th position between 4L and N which will give you 2wd low). Defective transfer case bearings are a common source of drive-train vibrations. It is well worth the time and effort to have the transfer case rebuilt.

Dana 24's are PTO-capable. The Dana 23/24 PTO's are very rare and highly prized by early Napco conversion truck owners. There were 2 styles: The early style Dana PTO that was a big cast unit that bolted directly to the case and the later style that used the standard 6 bolt PTO pattern with a thick adapter plate to fit the 23/24 cases. The early style are worth their weight in gold. My PTO mounts to the transmission, so it's not one of these.

If you are using 80 or 90W gear lube in your transmission or transfer case then it will not operate as smoothly as it should. Ford service and operating manuals both recommend using 50W engine oil in both the 4-speed manual trans and the transfer case when the operating temperatures are over 10 degrees Fahrenheit (30W engine oil is recommended when the operating temperatures are below 10 degrees Fahrenheit).

A big shortcoming of the Dana 24 case is it's lack of a strut rod or really any way to easily adapt one to it. Under heavy loading (such as towing conditions), a divorced transfer case tends to jerk forward-and-aft and makes for a rough ride and the truck's drivetrain takes a good beating from it.

DIFFERENTAL - DANA 44 FRONT and DANA 60 REAR

Dana 44 Front Dana 60 Rear

The original axles are the 3500# Dana 44 on the front and the 5200# Dana 60 with 4.10 ratio on the rear. Both of these axles have drum brakes. For a tremendous amount of good information on axiles go to this site. The '78 - '79 F250 and F350 had Dana 60 front and rear differentials with disk brakes on the front. The '79 F350 also had a Dana 80 Rear end. Other good years for a Dana 60 front differential are the '86 - '96 F350 with a solid axle. This combination is much better than what I have. So I will be on the hunt for them. However I'm not made of money so we will see what happens.

Existing Low pinion axle: The F250 axle was a low pinion Dana 44 until 1977.5, it also had closed knuckles until 75 and leaf spring mounts for all years.

Axle I would like to get:A Dana RS60 (Reverse Spiral) solid front axle from a 1977.5 to 1979 F350 it came on some F250 and all F350 4x4 trucks. Notice the open king pin knuckle with humongous 5-332x u-joints and disk brakes. This design was running a narrow front leaf spring setup and is very sought after. the drivers side tube is much longer than the 1985-1991 Dana 60 front. Thus this axle fits under smaller 4x4's much easier.

If I do get my hands on a set of differentials with disk brakes I will also have to change the master cylinder to a more modern unit. So really the best way of doing that is get everything from one truck.

The original axles are the Dana 44 on the front and the Dana 60 on the rear. Both of these axles have drum brakes.

The '78 - '79 F250 and F350 had Dana 60 front and rear differentials with front disk brakes. The '79 F350 also had a Dana 80 rear differential.

During the early '80s Ford used a independant front suspension which was a good idea. It just did not work out great. The '86-96 F350 has a solid axle front Dana 60 again with disk brakes. Using this axle is much better than what I have. So I will be on the hunt for one of these front differentials. However I'm not made of money so we will see what happens.

If I do get my hands on a differential with disk brakes I will also take the master cylinder to match the disk brake unit. So really the best way of doing that is get everything from one truck. As a note the new Super Duty trucks also have Dana 60 front differentials but they have auto locking hubs and I really don't want to tackle that right now.

 

PTO drive Winch

The winch turns out to be a Braden LU2 Winch manufactured in '63 and attached to a Dodge Power Wagon. Fortunately Braden still sells gasket kits for this model, although their web site is not easy to navigate so I still haven't figured out how to order it yet.

This winch is very powerful and is one of the things that make this truck what is is. So I will be retaining the winch and rebuilding it. I really can say nothing but good things about this unit. It appears you can mount it in either direction and just change which side the drive connects to.

 

Cool Technologies I would like to use but won't

Some of the things I would like to do but can’t afford or can’t seem to get a response about. These are technologies that I think would be great if I could implement them. Really I think using this technology on an old truck like this would prove that if it can work on thins it will work anywhere. More food for thought at this point than anything.

 

ZF HyTronic

The first uses the existing drive train but adds a new transmission with a built in motor/generator. It is manufactured by ZF and is currently in a test phase with Mercedes Benz in some Sprinter Vans. Basically the unit allows you to run just the engine. You can run the engine and the motor together. Or just run the motor by itself without the engine. In addition you can use the engine to turn the motor into a generator in areas that have no power. Such as in the middle of nowhere or an area that has been hit by a disaster and lost services.

 

 

 

HI PA Drive

This system is a pure electric drive but instead of having a large motor providing power through the drivetrain each motor is in the wheel hub. This eliminates wasted energy driving a transmission, transfer case and differentials. The company has already shown it will work by installing it in a Ford F-150 and selling a fully assembled car in the UK. With this system it would be possible to use either all batteries or a hybrid system to power the motors.

 

 

 

Battery technology is all over the place and honestly I don’t know what’s the best but here are some of the current options.

A123 systems
International Battery

1971 4x4 F-250 Proposed body changes for the truck

Paint ideas

Cab - Changes, but original

Cab Assembly

The body is Candy Apple Red, well it was at some point. The original cab has seen better days. However it will be fixed to better than original shape. Apparently the vents on the side collect dirt and twigs and rust out. This will be fixed by inserting new metal and creating a drain screen combination. The cab mounts are shot and need to be replaced.  The driver side door is also caved in and needs to be replaced. I have gotten another driver side door that I think I can cannibalize for the metal. The passenger side door has numerous holes in it from attaching rear view mirrors to it then ripping them off. The roof has damage to it and needs some dolly work.  The short version is both front fenders are gone. The hood hinge mounts are gone as well. The grill and the trim piece directly below the grill are also beyond repair. The hood on the other hand has a minor dent in the front driver side corner. The rest of the sheet metal seems good, what's left anyway. Air conditioning is a planned upgrade however I have not worked out the vents yet.  A new modern power seat is planned.  It will be a bench seat not two bucket seats. However the seat shall have a fold down center console.  The floor, firewall, door insides cab mounts, underside of the cab and around the fuel tank will be covered with rhino lining to prevent rust and deaden sound and provide insulation.  Like I have said before the truck lived out it’s working life.  Now it’s play time.  I don’t intend to haul firewood, gravel, angry pit bulls or anything else that would seriously damage the truck.  I would love to find a way to incorporate new gauges into the old bezel. But I have not found a speedometer similar to the one in the truck.

The original cab has seen better days. However it will be fixed to better than original shape. Apparently the vents on the side collect dirt and twigs and rust out. This will be fixed by inserting new metal and creating a drain screen combination. The cab mounts are shot and need to be replaced.  The driver side door is also caved in and needs to be replaced. The roof might have damage to it but at this time I’m not 100% sure.  Air conditioning is a planned upgrade however I have not worked out the vents yet.  A new modern power seat is planned.  It will be a bench seat not two bucket seats. However the seat shall have a fold down center console.  The floor, firewall, door insides cab mounts, underside of the cab and around the fuel tank will be covered with rhino lining to prevent rust and deaden sound and provide insulation.  Like I have said before the truck lived out it’s working life.  Now it’s play time.  I don’t intend to haul firewood, gravel, angry pit bulls or anything else that would seriously damage the truck.  I would love to find a way to incorporate new gauges into the old bezel.

 

Bed - Totally new

Bed Assembly

The bed will be off of a 72 Camper Special. It does have the spare fuel tank filler hole and the tool box on the passenger side. However the fuel tank is not in my possession so a new one will be needed. I really must say thank you to my uncle Eric at this point for letting me have the bed and new driver side door. Thank you! The trim package that was originally on the bed is of a Ranger so it is a little different. The inside of the bed will be lined with Rhino Lining. I was thinking of covering the top of the bed rails and inside of the tailgate with Rhino as well. The underside of the bed and the wheel wells will be covered with LineX. I plan on making the bed look as close to original as possible. But give myself as much durability as possible at the same time. The bed is in surprisingly good condition. No major dents and only minor rust. At least it seems minor now.

The bed will be a totally new one off of a 72 Camper Special. It does have the spare fuel tank and the tool box on the passenger side. However the fuel tank is to long to fit in my truck so a new one will be needed. I really must say thank you to my uncle Eric at this point for letting me have the bed and new driver side door. Thank you! The trim package that was original might be different than the one on my truck but I'm not totally sure yet as I don't have the bed yet. So for now that may be an issue to be dealt with later. The inside of the bed will be lined with Rhino Lining. I was thinking of covering the top of the bed rails and inside of the tailgate with Rhino as well. The bottom of the bed and the Wheel wells will be covered with LineX. I plan on making the bed look as close to original as possible.

 

Front End - Some old some new

Bumper Detail

The front bumper is a monster right now. I will make an attempt to tame it a little. I am keeping the wench. It is part of the truck and will remain for as long as I can keep it running. The original bumper is mounted to the front of the wench so it sticks out two feet in front of the nose. Try parking in a modern lot designed for compact cars with that. Not an easy task. My plan is to design a new bumper pulley combo that is shorter and more functional. It will have lights for getting in and out of 4X trails at night. It will have tow hooks and a cover so I can stand on it to work on the engine. It will also have a mounting location for a pulley mast.

The front bumper is a monster right now. I will make an attempt to tame it a little. I am keeping the wench. It is part of the truck and will remain for as long as I can keep it running. The original bumper is mounted to the front of the wench so it sticks out two feet in front of the nose. Try parking in a modern lot with that. Not an easy task. My plan is to design a new bumper pulley combo that is shorter and more functional. It will have lights for getting in and out of 4X trails at night. It will have tow hooks and a cover so I can stand on it to work on the engine. It will also have a mounting location for a pulley mast.

1971 4x4 F-250 Proposed Interior changes for the truck

The current situation

For the most part I want the interior to remain similar to the original. However some things just have to change, the seat is hell if you have to spend much time sitting in it. The sterio is like listening to two cans and a string, pathetic. If it's hot outside you will die, no A/C to be found. So with that said I will be changing things to a more modern version.

 

Seat Color idea

So this is the interior in the Harley Davidson special edition. I want to come up with a seat configuration simillar to this one, however I am planning on using a bench seat instead of buckets. That way the center can fold up if I need three people to fit in the truck. Also because I want a stick shift, mine can't have a center console.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DVD Navigation

The original stereo is just an AM/FM radio. Not exciting at all. So I plan on stepping up the electronics by a mile by pushing the technology into the tweny first century; enter Kenwood. The Kenwood DNX7140 is another new in dash DVD + navigation system. The DNX7140 has Garmin navigation and Bluetooth technology. It has a 6.95″ LCD touchscreen which is an easy to use interface to control all audio, video and navigation functions. The Kenwood DNX7140 also supports SMS texting and wireless A2DP audio streaming with Bluetooth. Other features of DNX7140 include vehicle mileage tracker for keeping an eye maintenance schedule and gas mileage. I am hoping that somehow I can get the thing to pop up, out of the top of the dash sort of like the new 2011 Audi. In a perfect worl I would be able to just use the SYNC system from a 2011 super duty but I probobly have a better chance of being hit by a meteor.

 

In Car Computer

Something I have been thinking of is installing an onboard computer. A finished unit can be found at Xenarc. Xenarc introduces one of the world's most powerful mini Fan-less PC. Like its name, the PC doesn't use a Fan for cooling but it is still able to operate at a 120 degree Fahrenheit environment. This PC uses a Socket 478 Intel Mobile Celeron (Pentium M Class) 1.73GHz processor. The unit takes 12 Volt DC, and we are able to cut power consumption to less than 40W with our proprietary technology. Shock and vibration is handled by its 2.5" slim Hard Disk Drives or a flash SATA drive (DOC, DOM) can also be installed to make the unit a completely non-mechanical PC. This low power consuming, but yet powerful PC is perfect for in-vehicle computing or industrial computing use. You can install your choice of a CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-ROM/CD-RW, or DVD-RW drive. Can't believe we can pack that much power into this little box? See it yourself.

 

This PC comes included with an instruction manual, CPU Heat Sink, an AC adaptor, and drivers CD.

Couple this Mini Aluminum PC with our 7-Inch VGA Monitor, Model #700YV or Model #700TSV for your various mobile and in-car computing needs.

 

Add an optional PSU-PC12 In-Car Computing Power Supply Unit with intelligent shut-down controller for use inside a vehicle.

 

Motherboard and Components

To build a custom unit, motherboards and many other components can be found at mini-itx.com MSI Fuzzy MS-7199 Mini-ITX board with 1.5GHz C7 CPU running at 1.5GHz. VIA CN700G + VT8237R chipset supporting VGA, S-Video and DVI-D graphics outputs. Up to 1GB of DDR2 533/667MHz RAM; 5.1 Channel AC97 Audio and Realtek RTL8110SC Gigabit LAN. PCI.

 

Rear Panel Connectors: PS2 Mouse & Keyboard; VGA; DVI-D; S-Video; 2x USB 2.0; 1x Gigabit LAN; 2x Serial; 3x 3.5mm Audio (Line-out, Line-in and Mic-in).

 

Board connectors: 1x IDE 66/100/133; 2x SATA supporting RAID 0 and 1; 20 pin ATX power; 1x DDR2 DIMM socket; 6x additional USB 2.0 connectors on 3x 9 pin headers; 1x Fan connector; 1x PCI slot.

1971 4x4 F-250 swap info

Overview

My project is as follows. I have a 1971 Ford F-250 4x4 Custom Deluxe, commonly known as a highboy. It has a 390 FE engine, 4 speed New Process 435 transmission, Dana 24 transfer case, Dana 40 front axle and Dana 60 rear with drum brakes all around.

My first choice was What engine would I use. I did not want to use the original 390 FE big block that is in the truck due to the fact that it gets about 6 miles to the gallon. I had thought about getting very radical and converting the truck to an electric system. However after contacting a couple companies and getting no response I killed that idea. So I changed my plans and was going to use a 351W with explorer P heads and Holly fuel injection. I had even purchased a five speed ZF transmission with a small block bolt pattern for it. Then I found out about the Modular 4.6L, which looked interesting. Then the question hit me, what are the current trucks using as an engine? At that time I discovered the 5.4L and realized it had more torque than the 4.6L and impressive HP ratings. I started looking on the internet and found that the 5.4L has a big brother the 5.4L DOHC with even more low end torque. Perfect, except for one thing they only come in a handful of vehicles, most notably the Lincoln Navigator. During my search I found some really good information on the 4.6L so if that is what you want you should read this. I have some info on the 4.6L and 6.8L but really most of the information here is for the 5.4L because that is what I am now going to use. So my own plans have changed dramatically over the course of this adventure. Now that I have a fixed plan I can focus and move forward.

Now that you know the gory details of what I have let’s get into what I want. I am going to install a Lincoln Navigator 5.4L DOHC Modular engine controlled by an EEC-V computer with a Ford 6 speed ZF S6-650 transmission from a 2wd truck. My transfer case is known as a divorced transfer case. This means it is not attached to the transmission but has a short drive shaft attaching it to the transmission, so I don't want the 4x4 version. I plan on using the current transfer case and rear differential. For a tremendous amount of good information on axles go to this site. The '77.5 - '79 F250 and F350 had Dana 60 front and rear differentials with disk brakes on the front. The '79 F350 also had a Dana 80 Rear end. Originally I wanted a Dana 60 front differential from the '86 - '96 F350 with a solid axle. however the frame width is not the same. 79' and older frames use a 31.5" spacing for axles. That is center of frame to center of frame on the other side. 80' and up use 36" pad spacing, also the pumpkin is closer to driver side frame rail on the newer vehicles. So you can't use '80 or up Axles in older vehicles without modification. I will stick with the older axles and add disk brakes from Blackbirds custom trucks. Of course I will be upgrading the master cylinder as well in order to be safe.

Engine

Ok first off the term Modular has really nothing to do with the engine but the way the factory was setup. The original factory setup was Modular so they could swap out part of an assembly line and build different engines quickly. The two engine plants (Windsor and Romeo) were to manufacture the 4.6L, 5.4L, and 6.8L as well as a V6. The Romeo and Windsor plants have different designs for main bearings, heads (cam caps), camshaft gears (press-on vs. bolt on), valve covers (number of bolts), crankshaft (number of flywheel bolts), and cross bolt fasteners for main bearing caps. An Italian company named Teksid built the first 4.6L blocks in Lincoln MK VIII’s; from what I can tell these are the ones to get if you are going to use a 4.6L

Triton is the Ford Truck name for Modular engines and has nothing to do with the number of valves. Silly me thinking Triton meant three valve, not totally correct. They are 2, 3 or 4 valve and come as 4.6L, 5.4L or 6.8L. InTech is the Lincoln Truck name for Modular engines, which have 2, 3 or 4 valves and come in 4.6L or 5.4L however I don't think they have a 6.8L.

4.6L DOHC engines have come with iron and aluminum blocks. You can find the aluminum blocks in Cobra's, Lincoln Aviator's, Lincoln Mark Series and the Lincoln Continental. Teksid in Italy casts these blocks for Ford. All of the aluminum engines are assembled at the Romeo plant. No SOHC engines have ever been cast in aluminum, although the blocks are generally interchangeable between the DOHC and SOHC. The only exception is the transverse mounted Continental engine, which is front wheel drive. Obviously this block will not work in a rear wheel drive configuration. It does make you think of some cool cars you could mount the engine into. The oil pan on the Continental is a front sump so it can be used in certain situations on other Modular engines where that would be needed.

Four-Valve 5.4L InTech Lincoln Navigator engines have been around since 1999. They feature forged-crankshafts and aluminum cylinder heads. However Navigator connecting rods are fracture-split powdered metal, so you do not want to push them to far or you will be sorry. I am thinking of changing them to a set of Manley rods. The 5.4L engines have iron blocks except for the cast aluminum in the supercharged GT40. The 6.8L engines have iron blocks except for a Mustang concept vehicle that was aluminum.

All of the PI (performance Improved) heads are the same, so 5.4L Triton PI heads are the same as Mustang PI heads. The 5.4L cams have a higher lift so that is a difference. Unlike the 4.6L the 5.4L and 6.8L did not have PI heads until 2000. 4.6L's found in the Lincoln Aviator have an aluminum intake manifold with variable-length runners, similar to FRPP's FR500 intake. Aviator 4.6s also use the same DOHC heads as Terminator and Mach 1 Mustangs. The Windsor heads use 14 bolts for the valve covers while Romeo engines use 11. That is the easiest way to tell them apart but there are lots of differences. Twin port heads have never been offered for the 5.4L engines. The best heads are on the Navigator and the Cobra R. The Navigator heads have the capability to flow a large amount of air with a port and polish. There is no real advantage to using the Cobra heads and they are very expensive.

Intake

For my application the intake is not a problem. I have lots of hood clearance. However people who are putting a 5.4L in a car, new or old, will have clearance issues. Several solutions are out there, some change the 5.4L to a carbureted engine, however other examples retain the EFI system.

Electrical

My engine swap will retain the fuel injection. All 5.4 engines use COP ignition, 2000 and later 4.6 use COP ignition. 1997-99 4.6 engines use coil packs. Some popular swaps involve using a coil pack EEC and wiring harness on a COP engine converted to use coil packs.

Apparently the '98 Cobra EEC is the one to get for custom swaps. The part code is "AOL2" and it is a return-style fuel system ready box that has faster and more processing capacity than other EEC's, which is what makes this the box to get. However, most of the information I have found about this box is from 03' or earlier so the question I have is has anything new come out since then that is better? Also the Cobra EEC uses coil packs not COP ignition. The '03 and newer Navigator uses a EEC with tree plugs attached to it. I have gotten a '02 unit from a navigator, I can use a kit from The Detail Zone to wire the whole system. I visited the guys at The Mustang Shop and got lots of help, in the form of advice. They use the wiring kits from The Detail Zone and then program the EEC to remove or modify parameters in the EEC to work with whatever setup they need. The important thing is get an EEC that ran a similar engine. So if you are using a DOHC engine get an EEC that ran a DOHC engine.

Tuning

The aftermarket has a few standalone units now and even Ford has released a kit for swapping Modular engines into older vehicles. So some of the units available are as follows, ACCEL's DFI, FAST's XFI system, Ford Racing, and Spectre Performance's eMS-Pro, Reenmachine. I will just use a EEC out of an '02 Navigator wired to a Detail Zone harness and have The Mustang Shop tune it.

Fuel System

According to all documentation that I can find the '03 Navigator is supposed to be a returnless fuel system. However the engine that I have has a return fuel rail on it. I'm not sure what's up with that, so I will retain the return-style fuel system. I am going to use a fuel tank out of an '03 F250 that also uses a return fuel system. Also the fuel tank should fit my truck a little easier. However it's not going to be real easy because the cross membersin the frame are different and so they might have to be modified. I may remove the crossmembers out of the '03 frame shorten them a bit and mount them in place of the members on my frame. I have found out that the space between my transfer case and the rear axle is about 4' even, the fuel tank is 5' long. So that's going to be a problem. The other system I had thought of using was Aeromotive's including a pump, regulator, and 1/2-inch line. A return-style fuel setup is recommended by most people that I have read about doing this swap, It's the best way to eliminate fuel starvation and vapor locking issues. For me using the stock system has advantages in the fact that it will be stock parts of something breaks in the future.

Cooling System

The 4.6L, 5.4L & 6.8L cast iron blocks use a cooling system that is different from the aluminum blocks. The aluminum engines have a bypass hose to eliminate hot spots. This is due to aluminum being more susceptible to hot spots than cast iron. The radiator in newer trucks is huge in both height and width but not very thick. The radiator in my truck is not very tall or wide but very thick. I am going to maintain the old radiator in my swap. If it could cool a 390 Big Block I think it can handle a 5.4l. However I could be wrong so I will be keeping an eye on the temp. guage when this finally starts to run.

Engine Mounts

All Modular engines have the same mounting locations on the block. This means any Modular engine mount will bolt directly onto the block and cross member. The only engine that does not work is the front wheel drive transverse mounted Continental blocks. The Cobra R used engine mounts that lowered the engine 12mm, It still retained the ability to bolt into a stock cross member. The mounts I will be using are from a Mercury Merauder. They have a different design where they mount to the cross member. Instead of mounting to a sloped cross member the have a huge bolt pointing straight down. This will allow me to position the engine and weld plates to my cross member way easier than an angled engine mount.

Exhaust

The 4.6L & 5.4L share the same exhaust port configuration. This means you can use a pair of Cobra headers for a 5.4L engine. Now with that said the Modular engine is really wide so not all headers will fit in your vehicle. I have the advantage of having a huge engine bay, but Mustangs for instance I think are limited to shorty headers.

A thing to keep in mind as well is that if O2 sensors are being used you want to use shorter headers otherwise the exhaust gas gets to cold on full size headers at startup. A list of possible headers are as follows, Hooker, Bassani, JBA and Kooks. If you are swapping a 4.6L for a 5.4L the collectors on the exhaust manifolds are set at different angles and locations. So you will need to have a muffler shop modify your 4.6 exhaust to match up. I am going to use shorty headers and then run the exhaust uner the frame rail and along the outside with the tip coming out in front of the rear tires. The reason for this is that the exhaust would interfier with the fuel tank I will be adding along the inside of the fraim rail. I could run the pipes together in a two to one setup but that's not going to happen. I want dual exhaust.

Accessories

Some engines have 8 rib serpentine belts and some have 6. Be sure to verify everything has the same pulley setup. as for what willbe driven, well all the original equipment except the fan. I am going to add A/C and power steering to the truck but will remove the belt driven fan for an electric unit.

Transmission

I have a 6 spd manual transmission from a '02 F250 two whel drive for my truck. The 4.6L, 5.4L, 6.0L Diesel and 6.8L all have the same bellhousing bolt pattern. On the trucks the odd man out is the 7.3L That means that all the transmissions will bolt up except the 7.3L. All the 5.4 engines have 8 bolt crankshafts the Romero 4.6L engines have 6 bolt cranks so flexplates or flywheels will have to match. Oh yeah and the trans only has a PTO drive on the driver side even though everyone said they have them on both sides.

Misc.

Mustang web sites (www.streetstangs.net, www.hardcore50.com, www.modularfords.com, and www.modularfox.com) have lots of good information even for truck swaps.

Configurations I have found on the inter web

Steves Auto Restorations
The Detail Zone
The Mustang Shop

 

5.4 Navigator engine in a mustang @ Stangnet.com
Mach 1 PCM
Mach 1 wiring harness.
NOT dyno'd,
The tune currently in the car is an SCT high performance Mach 1 tune, with a bit of fuel added.
Mach 1/Cobra exhaust manifolds with very minor mods.
Navi has an 8 bolt crankshaft, so a Cobra bellhousing, flywheel and clutch can be used.
Any 4.6 trans will fit, mine is a 2000 "R" spec T56 from FRPP.

 

Boss 330, Great project and photos.
5.4 Navigator engine in a mustang
97 Cobra harness EEC-V harness.
Manual trans not an issue using Cobra ECM.
The source of the plumbing from the throttle body outward is the UPR powerpipe and their "bigmouth" filter. But, you don't want to use a C&L MAF meter with it as it causes some running problems with the C&L. If you want to use an aftermarket MAF meter with it get a Pro-M 80mm (short) calibrated for whatever size injectors you are using and all will be GOOD! Their web address is UPRProducts.com and their phone # is 561-588-6630 just ask for Joe.

 

Summary of Changes

Proposed Changes

Modify Dash for a 2 DIN Stereo - GPS, DVD Kenwood Unit

Create vent openings in dash

Cup holders

Tilt Steering - I did it

New Gauges - 67' - 68' Mustang Cluster Black back w/red info

Light on bottom of doors

Alarm

Headliner central control

New seat w/center console that folds out of way, heated and power

GPS theft tracking

Rear view camera

LCD turn, brake, tail, side marker lights

AV hookup in bed

Spare tire wench and light under bed

Cargo net behind seat

Engine oil cooler

Trans cooler

Tires - MHT driv off-road, Blitz black 18 x 10

BFG Mud-Terrain TA KMZ 35 x 12.50 R 18 D

Garage door opener in sun visor

JBA Headers

Flowmaster mufflers 2 1/2"

E3 Spark plugs

3/16" Custom front bumper

 

Finishes

 

Frame - Powder coat, Black (if painted, 2 coats self etching primer, 5 coats fill primer, 5 coats paint)

Springs - Powder coat, Black

Axles - Powder coat, Silver

Driveshaft - Powder coat, Silver

Wheels - Powder coat, Red and Black

Shocks - Powder coat, Silver

Bumpers - Powder coat, Black

Exhaust - Coated, Black

 

Body Paint

1 coat - Acid etch primer

4 coats - Primer

5 coats - Color

5 coats - Clear

 

Teardown and rebuild

Strip parts, trim, glass, label everything

Soda Blast

Start replacing Sheet metal

Test fit engine and trans

Test fit rest of drivetrain

Continue sheet metal replacement

Start building sub enclosure & shelf system behind seat

Fab headers if off shelf don't fit

After all sheet metal fab is done remove frame & all suspension for powder coating

Reassemble frame and all drivetrain, install brake system and fuel system

Paint body parts (do not paint inside of bed)

Line-X bed

Install glass, trim, wires, dynamat, dash, panels, radiator bracket, radiator, hoses, fenders, rubber, carpet, seats, test engine, finish small stuff

 

Important Notes

79' and older frames use a 31.5" spacing for axles. That is center of frame to center of other side.

80' and up use 36" pad spacing, also the pumpkin is closer to driver side frame rail. So you can't use 80 or up Axles in older vehicles without modification. I will try to find a reverse spiral D60 from a 77.5 to 79 F-350, this is also on some F-250's.

 

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